Lucky Leprechaun Wands

By John Bomhoff
Art Studio Manager, Children’s Museum of Phoenix

Children will learn about the magic behind St. Patrick’s Day with this craft from the  Children’s Museum of Phoenix.

Ages: preschool & up.

Materials: clear or white plastic drinking straws, paper scraps (construction paper, tissue paper, etc.),  colored pencils or markers, scissors, glue sticks, scotch tape and glitter (optional).

Instructions:

Discuss St. Patrick’s Day, leprechauns, and magic wands with your children using the information provided below.

Choose a straw.  Take scraps of paper and create shamrocks, tissue paper streamers, and/or other decorations.  Cut them out.

Decorate the paper with pictures or words using the colored pencils or markers.

Tape the decorations to one end of the straw.

Add glitter with the glue if you desire.

Use your wand to create magical moments.

TEACHABLE MOMENTS

This is a great opportunity to present the following information on St. Patrick’s Day to your children.  St. Patrick’s Day is celebrated on March 17th in honor of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland.  The shamrock and the leprechaun are symbols of Ireland.  The shamrock is a plant that can bring good luck.  The leprechaun is a little old man, like a fairy, who can grant three wishes to any person who captures him.  Here is a St. Patrick’s Day Limerick:

There once was a shamrock named Pat.

Who tripped on a root and went splat.

She ripped her best leaf.

And sobbed in her grief,

And ruined her favorite hat.

ABOUT THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PHOENIX

The mission of the Children’s Museum of Phoenix is to engage the minds, muscles and imaginations of children and the grown-ups who care about them. With hands-on, interactive exhibits designed for children ages birth to 10, the Museum focuses on learning through play, with emphasis on early childhood education and school-readiness.

The Children’s Museum of Phoenix is located at 215 N. 7th St. in downtown Phoenix, at the southeast corner of Seventh Street and Van Buren in the historic Monroe School Building.

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